Borrowing – Atos Victims Group http://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/ Mon, 27 Sep 2021 04:29:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Borrowing – Atos Victims Group http://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/ 32 32 New CEI Paper Revisits Viral Exchange on Payday Loan Rates by Katie Porter and Kathy Kraninger. https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/advantages-of-applying-for-an-alternative-financial-service/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/advantages-of-applying-for-an-alternative-financial-service/#respond Mon, 03 May 2021 12:35:10 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/?p=633 It’s not every day an exchange about a technical measurement for loans goes viral on social media. During a 2019 House Committee on Financial Services hearing, Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) pressed then-Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger to calculate the cost of a payday loan, using the federal government’s official measure of annual percentage rate […]]]>

It’s not every day an exchange about a technical measurement for loans goes viral on social media. During a 2019 House Committee on Financial Services hearing, Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) pressed then-Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger to calculate the cost of a payday loan, using the federal government’s official measure of annual percentage rate (APR). If you need to find a payday loan, you should use Bridge payday here to provide you with the money you need. 

During her questioning, Rep. Porter posed the hypothetical example of a single mother who had hastily obtained a payday loan to fix her car so she could get to work on time. She took out a two-week $200 payday loan with a $20 interest charge and a $20 origination fee. After explaining the example, she asked Kraninger to calculate the APR of the loan. Kraninger replied that the hearing was supposed to be “a policy conversation” and “not a math exercise.” Porter cut off Kraninger, saying she was “reclaiming my time,” before Kraninger had a chance to answer. The problem is that it was difficult for Kraninger to give a clear answer.

APR is the mathematical calculation that adds up the amount financed, interest, fees, and payment schedule into the cost of credit expressed as a yearly rate. Its disclosure is required by laws that govern all types of loans, including those with durations of much less than a year.

However, as Matthew Adams and I point out in a new CEI paper, APR disclosure rules have led to a distorted view of short-term lending. Under the traditional formula for calculating APR, the loan in Rep. Porter’s example would total a colossal 520 percent interest rate. However, the single mother in question would only have had to pay 20 percent interest, or $40, if she paid back the loan on time, within the two-week duration of the typical payday loan.

Hardly any of Kraninger’s critics were asking how long it typically takes borrowers to pay off these loans and what polic ymakers can do to align disclosure rules with what they actually pay. Adams’s and my paper looks at those vital questions and proposes solutions to help foster a competitive market in short-term lending that can help struggling consumers. We hope you enjoy and get some insights from it.

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Inside DC’s Pandemic-Fueled Real Estate Boom https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/inside-dcs-pandemic-fueled-real-estate-boom/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/inside-dcs-pandemic-fueled-real-estate-boom/#respond Mon, 03 May 2021 07:27:18 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/?p=360 On a blue-sky Saturday last September, David Abrams arrived a half hour early to his listing at 4 Wynkoop Court in Bethesda. He made his way through the checklist of new tasks that real-estate agents have had to master during the pandemic: opening windows, setting up hand-sanitizer stations, wiping down surfaces. Abrams anticipated that the […]]]>

On a blue-sky Saturday last September, David Abrams arrived a half hour early to his listing at 4 Wynkoop Court in Bethesda. He made his way through the checklist of new tasks that real-estate agents have had to master during the pandemic: opening windows, setting up hand-sanitizer stations, wiping down surfaces.

Abrams anticipated that the three-bedroom midcentury-modern would attract considerable attention, given its unusual architecture and desirable location. But he wasn’t prepared for what he saw out the window 15 minutes before go time. The line of people was dozens long and already snaking around the cul-de-sac. Abrams felt his anxiety spike. Is this safe?, he wondered.

It was six months into a global pandemic. Nationally, 740 people were succumbing to coronavirus every day. Public-health officials were advising Americans to avoid crowded places and indoor gatherings. And millions of people were out of work.

For a time, agents had reason to believe they could wind up among them. Washington’s bustling real-estate market slammed on the brakes when Covid first hit last spring. Buyers called off their searches. Sellers pulled listings. Those in the real-estate industry panicked. BEST HOUSING MARKET IN A DECADE COULD SUCCUMB TO CORONAVIRUS, warned a March 2020 Bloomberg headline.

“It was like, We’re never going to sell a house again,” recalls Hans Wydler, who has been in the business 20 years.

“I was a zombie,” says Alexandria agent Micki MacNaughton. “I told my husband, ‘Cancel everything we don’t need.’ I’m like, ‘Are we watching Hulu? Cancel that.’ ”

But by the time the shoppers were lined up at 4 Wynkoop, agents didn’t have to worry about paying for Hulu—though they might not have had time to watch it. The market was more frenzied than it had been in 15 years. July had been the most expensive month ever for DC-area real estate.

On one level, the situation was a searing example of Washington’s status as one of the nation’s most unequal regions: Despite soaring unemployment, despite shuttered restaurants and shops, despite the many residents struggling to afford groceries, the local homebuying population had not only grown wealthier—it was hungrily looking for a change of scenery.

That’s the big national story, at any rate. Down on the pavement, where crowds were lining up in places like Bethesda, it meant that would-be homebuyers were feeling like gladiators. And it meant that professionals such as David Abrams were suddenly feeling more like traffic cops—and public-health monitors—than like listing agents. As he stood on the porch chatting with people who’d waited 40 minutes to get in, he did his best to enforce social distancing. “The way I could tell how many people were in the house was by the number of shoes at the door,” he says. “I was looking in the window from the front, counting shoes.”

By the end of the afternoon, he estimates that 120 people had come through. On top of that, the home also had more than 115 private showings in six days on the market. When Abrams tallied the offers that rolled in, he could hardly believe it—20 in all. The house had been listed for $949,000. The triumphant bidders, a pair of lawyers, paid $1.2 million.

Listing agent David Abrams was flooded with offers on this midcentury-modern house in Bethesda. Photograph courtesy of HomeVisit

People in Washington these days don’t really buy houses. They win them. There was the picturesque Tudor in Silver Spring that asked $798,000, then sold for $943,000 after reeling in 22 offers. There was the modern three-bedroom near Glen Echo that also got 22 bids—despite that its owner didn’t allow an open house and required everyone who made a private appointment to first show proof of approval by a lender. That one asked $899,000 and sold for more than $1.1 million.

There was the place in North Cleveland Park, where so many people wanted to get in that listing agent Amy Levin had to reprogram the lockbox to allow for 24-hour access. The brick Colonial was priced at $1.595 million and got $1.775 million. After that, says Levin, “I called the 12 other people I’ve ever sold houses to over there and was like, ‘You’ve gotta get your house on the market.’ ”

And then there was the five-bedroom in Alexandria with the great backyard. On the afternoon of the open house, listing agent Marian Rosaaen turned onto the cul-de-sac and at first couldn’t make sense of the crowd: “Hand to God, I said, ‘Is someone having a block party right now?’ ” The home, listed for $624,500, got 54 offers. Fifty-four. (As of press time, the sale hadn’t closed.)

Interviews with more than two dozen local agents turn up similar stories from one side of the Beltway to the other, one jaw-dropping scenario after another. They also reveal an explanation for what’s going on—a trend that long preceded the calamitous arrival of Covid.

As anyone who’s tried to buy a house in the last decade knows, Washington has been in the throes of a worsening housing shortage since the Great Recession. The last time the area had a six-month supply of homes for sale—the threshold for a balanced market—was nearly 12 years ago, according to the real-estate site UrbanTurf. For the past couple of years, the supply has hovered mostly between one and a half and two months, according to Bright MLS, the listing service that local agents use. All the while, prices have risen and regional leaders have fretted about housing costs scaring away the middle class and damaging the region’s ability to compete.

Now add in a global health crisis that dramatically changed what people wanted out of their houses, a big population of white-collar Washingtonians whose job security has been unscathed by Covid, a Wall Street hot streak that has helped the stock portfolios of affluent buyers, and interest rates below 3 percent. The result? A surge in extremely motivated house-hunters fighting over an even more depleted number of options. The latest data, in fact, shows that inventory has plummeted to a one-month supply, meaning that if new listings were to dry up entirely, currently available houses would sell out in a mere four weeks.

So far, there’s little hope for improvement: Though they might be tempted by the potentially astronomical profits, plenty of would-be sellers remain on the sidelines thanks to Covid’s distorting impact on the law of supply and demand. It’s hard to put your house up for sale, after all, when you’re not sure where you’ll be able to go next.

This Tudor in Silver Spring asked $798,000, and sold for $943,000. Listing agent Liz Brent says the house got 22 offers.

So the mad scramble gets madder. “I’ve been a bouncer at some of our open houses,” says Alexandria agent Brittany Patterson. “We’ve seen people try to cut in line. It’s a little like kindergarten.”

Another reason showings need crowd control is that a lot of sellers are loath to let too many people in—either to limit their exposure to the virus or simply because they’re stuck at home. Such was the case with a townhouse in a beyond-the-Beltway part of Silver Spring,­ on the market for less than $500,000. It had been listed on a Thursday, with an offer deadline only two days later. “The owner was still living in the house and was working, so there were huge chunks of time you couldn’t get in. It was booked solid,” says agent Peggy Ferris, whose clients were desperate to see it.

Tellingly, the inconvenient situation didn’t hurt the sale. In a last-ditch attempt, Ferris and her buyers decided to show up without an appointment. “We sat outside trying to get in at, like, 5:30 at night before the offers were presented,” says Ferris. Finally, word came down from the seller’s agent—they already had 15 offers. No one else would be allowed inside.

In fact, the real house-hunter’s dream is to avoid the insanity altogether by finding a home before it’s publicly listed. A couple I’ll call Ben and Lisa (who, to speak candidly about finances, didn’t want their real names used) thought they had struck gold when their agent, Jen Walker, got a lead on a Rosemont house whose owners wanted to sell off-market. As far as Ben and Lisa knew, they were the first ones in the door. They fell in love, booked an inspection for the very next morning, and handed in a full-price contract that night. Then . . . silence. Turns out a neighbor had seen their home inspector, caught on to what was happening, and swooped in with an all-cash offer. “It was just like, Are you kidding me?” says Lisa.

About a month later, in September, Walker emailed with another option. She knew a developer with approved plans to build a five-bedroom house, also in Rosemont. One catch: It would cost about $300,000 more than Ben and Lisa’s original $1.5-million budget. And another thing: It might not be finished until August 2021. At that point, Ben and Lisa—along with their dog and toddler son—had been quarantining in their two-bedroom Logan Circle condo since March. Every trip outside required navigating a germ gauntlet of shared door handles and elevator buttons. “We have a two-year-old who wants to put whatever’s closest at hand into his mouth,” explains Ben.

But August sounded better than never. They went for it.


If the booming prices are a continuation of a longstanding reality, the contours of the current market represent a dramatic shift from recent trends. For the better part of the 21st century, as the urban population swelled and public policy reoriented to promote transit and walkable neighborhoods, the condo market shot up—in central DC as well as in built-up suburbs like Bethesda and Arlington. Things were more sluggish, on the other hand, in leafy, car-dependent areas.

But Covid has changed our sense of space, not to mention our interest in sharing that space with strangers. Though the red-hot market has encompassed large parts of the District, the blocks upon blocks of glassy new condos and apartments are distinctly cold. More people in the city tried to unload those units in 2020 than ever before on record, with condo inventory up by 17 percent compared with 2019. Arlington and Bethesda also saw a deluge of condos hit the market—their inventories were up by nearly 30 percent and 13 percent, respectively.

So many buyers wanted to see this North Cleveland Park house that listing agent Amy Levin had to reprogram the lockbox to allow 24-hour access. The place sold for $180,000 over asking.

The consensus among agents is that unless a unit has two or more bedrooms and private outdoor space, it’s likely to be a dud, at least for now. There’s the ick factor of communal living, of course, but the contingent of would-be con-do buyers—often a younger demographic on a tighter budget—has also been harder hit economically. Meanwhile, the other population of recent condo buyers—baby boomers downsizing to an urban pied-à-terre—are newly aware of their vulnerability and less keen on moving downtown. Plus, with their twentysomething kids moving home due to the pandemic, they’re temporarily no longer empty-nesters.

“This was the first time in a very, very long time that we had move-in-ready, almost underpriced product just sitting on the market,” says broker Lindsay Dreyer of her condo listings. She points to a unit she sold in the fall—a one-bedroom in Columbia Heights. “When I chatted with [the seller], I was like, ‘If you sold a year ago, we could have gotten 325 or 330.’ ” Instead, the listing spent more than a month on the market before settling for $299,000.

A Roller Coaster Year

Highlights of the pandemic market

April ’20: Amid Covid-19 lockdowns, the number of homes listed for sale this month in the Washington area dropped by more than 37 percent compared with the previous April. The number that went under contract plummeted by 41 percent—the sharpest decline in a decade.

June ’20: With lockdowns loosened—and people growing desperate for more space—the frenzy began. More homes went under contract this month than during any other June in the past decade.

July ’20: Prices were officially soaring. This month, the median cost of DC rowhouses exceeded $800,000 for the first time on record.

October ’20: The median price of single-family detached houses in the District exceeded $1 million for the first time.

December ’20: By the end of the year, the inventory of homes for sale in the area had cratered to one month’s worth of supply for the first time ever. (A six-month supply is considered a balanced market.)

January ’21: The market shows no sign of slowing in the new year. In January, a typically slow month for real estate, listings in Washington lasted an average of only 11 days on the market—15 fewer than in January 2020.

In downtown Bethesda, agent Wendy Banner has a condo that has languished more than 300 days. “It is, in my opinion, a steal,” she says, noting that its location, a block from Metro, would normally have buyers swarming. On the flip side, her mega­mansions farther out haven’t been this popular in more than a decade. “We started getting calls on every listing that we had in Potomac. Houses that could take years to sell were suddenly being snapped up in a couple weeks’ time.”

With vacations on hold, agents say high-end buyers have been clamoring for swimming pools and sport courts. Not to mention that with lending so cheap, they can get more for their money than ever before. The pandemic, which has revived interest in things like several-acre lots, has lifted the fortunes of places such as Potomac and Great Falls, where home prices grew by 6.2 percent and 16.3 percent, respectively, in 2020 after long stretches of flatlining.

But don’t toll the death knell for city living just yet. While it’s true that buyers at the moment seem to be prioritizing space over urban walkability, it’s not as if all the District’s downtown neighborhoods have tanked. Logan Circle, for instance, saw prices rise by more than 11 percent last year. Shaw had modest growth, at about 2.5 percent. The Zip code that includes H Street and NoMa increased by 4.6 percent.

Not everyone is ready to flee to the burbs, after all, and as agents explain it, the pandemic has turned all levels of homeowners into move-up buyers. “What we’re seeing is the young couple who bought a condo a few years ago and now they’re both working from home and, oh, by the way, they had a baby six months ago and they’re all crowding in 600 square feet,” says agent Dana Scanlon. “They’re looking for the next step up—a two-bedroom with a terrace, or a little rowhouse.”


For anyone who lived through the early-aughts boom and bust, the spectacles of 2021-style house-hunting—the lines of would-be buyers stretching down sidewalks, the sight-unseen offers, the giddiness-inducing financing opportunities—might come with a touch of dread. Are we in a bubble?

First, the good news: The answer appears to be no. Unlike during the overheated market of the Bush era—fueled by reckless lending practices and rampant speculation—today’s buyers must endure rigorous vetting to secure a mortgage. In bidding wars, sellers often perform even more due diligence, reviewing competitors’ finances to confirm who truly has the cash to close the deal.

Jeannette Chapman, director of the Stephen S. Fuller Institute at George Mason University, an authority on the regional economy, also emphasizes that as quickly as prices are appreciating, they’re not rising anywhere near as fast as they would in a bubble: The median Washington home value increased by 8.7 percent in 2020. In 2005, leading up to the crash, it rocketed by nearly 22 percent.

But even without a bubble, the situation is worrisome for other reasons. Rather than lifting all ships, this rising tide has exacerbated inequality. Homeownership was already out of reach for a lot of working-class Washingtonians—a disproportionate share of them people of color—before the pandemic. With those same parts of the population bearing much of Covid’s economic and human toll, the prospect of catching up has become considerably bleaker for them.

“For the region, it’s not healthy that we don’t have enough homes at a lot of different price points,” explains Jenny Schuetz, a senior fellow at Brookings. “It’s a danger if the middle class can’t stay—the middle class is a lot of your tax base.”

Programs designed before the Covid boom to help balance opportunities also often don’t work in the current market. Veteran loans, FHA loans, and teacher programs, for example, typically require that financing and appraisal contingencies be included in offers—clauses that allow buyers to get out of a contract if their loan falls through or the home doesn’t appraise for the sale price. But these days, when competing buyers are liable to waive all contingencies, and when sellers scrutinize bids in search of the most conventional financing or all-cash offers, well-intentioned programs can be meaningless.

“We have lots of very vibrant communities here,” says Peter Tatian, the Urban Institute’s research director for greater DC, “and that’s what’s put at risk if housing costs get way out of line with what average working people can afford.”

This modern three-bedroom near Glen Echo was listed for $899,000 and sold for more than $1.1 million. Listing agent Dana Scanlon says it got 22 offers. Photograph by Anice Hoachlander; Design by Kim Gavin Design

Agents and economists do anticipate that the intensity will eventually ebb, at least somewhat. Rather than spawn entirely new buyer preferences, they predict that the pandemic has more likely just accelerated timelines. In other words, many young families crammed into condos were going to want big houses and yards anyway. It’s just that an unprecedented crisis caused more of them to pack up in search of those things seemingly overnight. At some point, the thinking goes, this migration will settle down.

But until then, the lines will keep forming. When he sorted through the stack of offers that came in on 4 Wynkoop Court last fall, Abrams found that 15 of the 20 were for more than $1 million, and most were contingency-free. Surely, amid such aggressive competitors, there were buyers who’d already struck out in multiple other bidding wars.

However, one-half of the winning couple who bought the home, Matthew Aichele, tells me he and his wife visited the open house almost on a whim. From their Penn Quarter condo, they’d been casually perusing online listings, but they hadn’t even hired an agent yet.

Says Aichele: “This was the first house we looked at.”

Unless otherwise stated, statistics about the local real-estate market are from Bright MLS, the listing service that agents in the Washington area use.

This article initially appeared in the April, 2021 issue of Washingtonian.

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Car manufacturers are now battery manufacturers https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/car-manufacturers-are-now-battery-manufacturers/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/car-manufacturers-are-now-battery-manufacturers/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 02:38:34 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/car-manufacturers-are-now-battery-manufacturers/ Want a greater analysis of electric and sustainable transport? Sign up for Transport Weekly, our free email newsletter. Battery technology will decide the winners and losers in the automotive industry of tomorrow. If you think that’s a dramatic statement, take a look at German auto giant Volkswagen’s two-hour event “Power Day,” which kicked off Monday […]]]>

Want a greater analysis of electric and sustainable transport? Sign up for Transport Weekly, our free email newsletter.

Battery technology will decide the winners and losers in the automotive industry of tomorrow.

If you think that’s a dramatic statement, take a look at German auto giant Volkswagen’s two-hour event “Power Day,” which kicked off Monday morning. It was a deep (deep!) Tesla-style dive into Volkswagen’s global plans for the development and manufacture of battery chemistry.

“Our goal is to establish a leading position in global battery sizing,” said Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess to kick off the show, which featured a battery enthusiast’s fun of charging patterns. anodes and cathodes, cutouts of battery cells and plans for future battery factories.

It hasn’t always been that way. Historically, automakers have devoted most of their efforts to the design and manufacture of the vehicles themselves, and left the problem of power supply to the suppliers of gasoline and diesel fuel.

Our goal is to establish a pole position in the global dimensioning of batteries.

But as more and more automakers commit to shifting all of their businesses towards electric vehicles, many are also investing more and more in chemistry and manufacturing their own power supplies, that is, ie the battery. At the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year, General Motors also devoted a lot of time to an introductory presentation devoted to the technical aspects of battery chemistry and development.

Tesla was the first automaker to start doing this years ago thanks to its core partnership with Panasonic and its investment in a battery “gigafactory” in Nevada and later elsewhere. Tesla’s playbook could be seen throughout the Volkswagen event – from the German company’s use of the word “gigafactory” to its battery-cell architecture.

It’s no surprise that Volkswagen is following suit. Following the diesel emissions scandal, the company pledged to electrify its entire lineup and announced that it would stop developing combustion platforms after 2026. Volkswagen delivered 134,000 vehicles last year. all electric in its ID range, an increase of 197% compared to the previous year.

Volkswagen is actually in a better position than Tesla years ago – with its Silicon Valley funding mishmash, government loans, and CEO personal investments – to take such a big leap in batteries. Volkswagen generates hundreds of billions of dollars a year in internal combustion vehicle sales, and battery manufacturing is a capital intensive business.

During Power Day, Volkswagen highlighted a few key partnerships that it hopes will help it achieve its battery goals. These battery partners include Northvolt, a Swedish battery maker, and QuantumScape, a Silicon Valley battery developer.

On Monday, Northvolt announced a $ 14 billion battery order from Volkswagen over the next 10 years. This is huge, especially since Northvolt is essentially a startup.

And this is proof that Volkswagen will not be able to achieve this colossal electrical transformation on its own. It will have to invest in as many external innovations as it can find around the world. Collaborating with these types of new and high-risk businesses will be a challenge.

But there is no going back now. As the CEO of Volkswagen said to kick off Power Day: “Electric mobility has won the race.

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Transat’s main shareholder refuses offer from Quebec businessman Péladeau – The Globe and Mail https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/transats-main-shareholder-refuses-offer-from-quebec-businessman-peladeau-the-globe-and-mail/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/transats-main-shareholder-refuses-offer-from-quebec-businessman-peladeau-the-globe-and-mail/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 02:38:22 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/transats-main-shareholder-refuses-offer-from-quebec-businessman-peladeau-the-globe-and-mail/ Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic in Paris (Reuters) – Transat AT Inc’s largest shareholder, Peter Letko, has said he will not sell his shares in the Canadian tour operator at the price offered by Quebec businessman Pierre Karl Péladeau, The Globe and Mail reported on Tuesday. . Letko, vice president of Letko Brosseau and Associates, said […]]]>

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic in Paris

(Reuters) – Transat AT Inc’s largest shareholder, Peter Letko, has said he will not sell his shares in the Canadian tour operator at the price offered by Quebec businessman Pierre Karl Péladeau, The Globe and Mail reported on Tuesday. .

Letko, vice president of Letko Brosseau and Associates, said he supports Transat AT’s plan to seek $ 500 million in loans and operate independently rather than selling at a discount, according to the https report: //www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article- says transats-plus-grand-shareionnaire-rebuffades-pierre-karl-peladeaus-offer.

Letko’s firm owns a 12.69% stake in Transat, according to data from Refinitiv.

Transat said it would hold talks with Péladeau, which offered the tour operator $ 5 per share, according to the report.

Canada’s largest airline, Air Canada, canceled its proposed acquisition of Transat for C $ 188.7 million ($ 150.04 million) last Friday, due to antitrust obstacles in Europe.

Péladeau, CEO of Canadian media and telecommunications company Quebecor Inc, said the offer he made for Transat in December was still available.

Transat said last week that its top priority was to secure financing and that it would consider all of its options, including Péladeau’s proposal.

Transat, Peter Letko and Quebecor did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment.

($ 1 = 1.2577 Canadian dollars)

(Reporting by Manojna Maddipatla in Bangalore; Editing by Shailesh Kuber)

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Mommy’s martyrdom creates a man-boy monster https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/mommys-martyrdom-creates-a-man-boy-monster/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/mommys-martyrdom-creates-a-man-boy-monster/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 02:37:41 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/mommys-martyrdom-creates-a-man-boy-monster/ Dear Amy: My boyfriend who has been alive for four years is selfish, provocative, impatient and impossible to talk to. He instantly lifts his guard, starts screaming and swerving! I always end up giving up before he rages and confuses me by reversing every conversation. I love him so much. I know he loves me […]]]>

Dear Amy: My boyfriend who has been alive for four years is selfish, provocative, impatient and impossible to talk to.

He instantly lifts his guard, starts screaming and swerving!

I always end up giving up before he rages and confuses me by reversing every conversation.

I love him so much. I know he loves me too. But sometimes I need him to grow up.

I have a 15 year old son. I had my son at 22. I was forced to grow up fast.

My boyfriend has never lived with a girlfriend before and has no children.

But I am a mother and a nurturer. I like to take care of “my boys”, but it’s never, never reciprocated. He can’t do anything for himself. I’m supposed to do it all! He works from home and usually starts drinking around noon. He drinks an average of fifteen beers a day.

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Abhishek Makwana, writer of Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah, commits suicide and his family suspects blackmail https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/abhishek-makwana-writer-of-taarak-mehta-ka-ooltah-chashmah-commits-suicide-and-his-family-suspects-blackmail/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/abhishek-makwana-writer-of-taarak-mehta-ka-ooltah-chashmah-commits-suicide-and-his-family-suspects-blackmail/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 02:37:15 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/abhishek-makwana-writer-of-taarak-mehta-ka-ooltah-chashmah-commits-suicide-and-his-family-suspects-blackmail/ Abhishek Makwana, one of the writers of the popular sitcom Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah, committed suicide. His family claimed he had been the victim of cyber fraud and blackmail. The family also claimed to have received threatening phone calls from people demanding that they repay the loans Abhishek allegedly took. According to a Mumbai […]]]>

Abhishek Makwana, one of the writers of the popular sitcom Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah, committed suicide. His family claimed he had been the victim of cyber fraud and blackmail.

The family also claimed to have received threatening phone calls from people demanding that they repay the loans Abhishek allegedly took.

According to a Mumbai Mirror report, Abhishek was found hanged in his Mumbai apartment on November 27 and his suicide note mentioned financial problems. His brother, Jenis, was quoted in the report as saying he became aware of these issues after Abhishek’s death when he started receiving phone calls.

Also Read: Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah Actor Samay Shah Attacked By Thugs, CCTV Footage Of Incident Shared Online

He said, “I checked my brother’s emails because since he passed away I have received several phone calls from different numbers demanding the repayment of loans he owed to someone. One call was a number registered in Bangladesh, one in Myanmar, and others were from different states in India.

Jenis added, “From what I understood from email recordings, my brother first took out a small loan from one of the ‘easy loan’ apps that charge a very high interest rate. raised. I watched closely the transactions between them and my brother after that. I noticed that they continued to send small amounts despite my brother not requesting the loans. Their interest rates can reach 30%.

Also Read: Taarak Mehta Ka Ooltah Chashmah Is Yahoo’s Most Wanted Show in 2020, Beats Bigg Boss and Mirzapur

An official at Charkop police station, where the case was recorded, said the family provided the police with the phone numbers and an investigation was underway into the deceased’s banking transactions.

If you need support or know someone who needs it, please contact your nearest mental health specialist. Help lines: Aasra: 022 2754 6669; Sneha India Foundation: +914424640050 and Sanjivini: 011-24311918

To follow @htshowbiz for more

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The day – A public memorial will be held on April 25 in honor of former NCDC president Jason Vincent https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/the-day-a-public-memorial-will-be-held-on-april-25-in-honor-of-former-ncdc-president-jason-vincent/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/the-day-a-public-memorial-will-be-held-on-april-25-in-honor-of-former-ncdc-president-jason-vincent/#respond Thu, 08 Apr 2021 02:36:45 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/the-day-a-public-memorial-will-be-held-on-april-25-in-honor-of-former-ncdc-president-jason-vincent/ A commemorative celebration of the event of life will take place at 5 p.m. on April 25 in honor of Jason Vincent, former president of Norwich Community Development Corp. and urban planner in Stonington. The event will take place at the Bozrah Farmers Market, 45 Bozrah St., Bozrah, and is open to the public. Registration […]]]>

A commemorative celebration of the event of life will take place at 5 p.m. on April 25 in honor of Jason Vincent, former president of Norwich Community Development Corp. and urban planner in Stonington.

The event will take place at the Bozrah Farmers Market, 45 Bozrah St., Bozrah, and is open to the public. Registration is requested on www.jvmemories.com.

Vincent, 46, died on December 30 by suicide in New River Gorge National Park in West Virginia.

Food trucks will be on hand for attendees to purchase some of Vincent’s favorite foods from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., and the ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. Anyone wishing to submit memorabilia or photos can submit articles to www.jvmemories.com.

The rainy date for the program will be May 2.

Vincent worked as Director of Planning at Stonington from 2002 to 2007 and again from 2016 to 2019. He was Deputy Executive Director at NCDC from 2012 to 2016 and returned to the agency as Senior Vice President in October 2019 before being named president this summer. of 2020 upon the retirement of former President Robert Mills.

Vincent led Norwich’s efforts to help businesses respond to the COVID-19 crisis this spring and last summer, helping restaurants establish outdoor restaurants and apply for federal grants and loans. He was also the associate owner of Epicure Brewing in downtown Norwich.

c.bessette@theday.com

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Notes of a silent transfer window https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/notes-of-a-silent-transfer-window/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/notes-of-a-silent-transfer-window/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:43 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/notes-of-a-silent-transfer-window/ The football transfer window closed over a week ago, but I usually run this feature after the Super Bowl ends, so I decided to wait until Bruce Arians won his very first title. before blogging on this topic. Why was this winter so calm?Because no one has any money. The coronavirus pandemic has messed up […]]]>

The football transfer window closed over a week ago, but I usually run this feature after the Super Bowl ends, so I decided to wait until Bruce Arians won his very first title. before blogging on this topic.

Why was this winter so calm?
Because no one has any money. The coronavirus pandemic has messed up everyone’s cash flow, so even the big spenders and teams that needed a midseason surge largely kept their wallets closed. The biggest moves have been mostly loans as Arsenal taking on former Norwegian prodigy Martin Ødegaard from Real Madrid for the remainder of the season.

Wait, can teams just borrow players from other teams like library books?
More or less. Such moves cost a small fee, and most come with a clause that allows the borrowing team to keep the player permanently if all parties agree. Theoretically, this ensures that everyone is doing well: the borrowing team gets the player’s services, the player gets playing time that he is unlikely to appreciate in his current squad, and the lending team gets the player’s services. a large sum of money and the ability to watch her man’s game. in a game situation. American sports leagues have something similar with teams trading for players on the trading deadline, but this market is generally limited to players whose contracts are expiring. In football, these loans can be given to anyone at any time, and they add a fascinating touch to running a team. Liverpool, for example, saw all of their center-backs get injured in the first part of the season, so they knocked out a few of those players at bargain prices until the end of the season in May. Even if Ben Davies and Ozan Kabak are just average, they may be able to keep the team afloat. (If either of them had played, they might have prevented Liverpool from being bombarded by Manchester City last Sunday.) Likewise, Arsenal struggle to score goals, and while Ødegaard does he hasn’t been able to break the starting lineup at Real, he has the talent to help create chances.

Why don’t all teams do it, especially now?
Loan moves generally don’t generate enthusiasm among fans or the press, even when superstars are on loan (like Real’s James Rodríguez to Bayern Munich a few years ago). Most loans are only for half a season, which can make it difficult to integrate the loaned players into their new environment. Still, it would be a potential boon for teams suffering from cash flow issues.

Like who?
Barcelona! This team is public, so their finances are common knowledge, and a recent report showed a large smoking crater where their money was located. They are now frantically trying to push back the due date on their $ 1.5 billion debt, and if they can’t, they may have to file for bankruptcy. Last October, I spoke about the mismanagement that alienated their biggest star, Lionel Messi, but neither of us had a clue how serious the situation was. It all makes you wonder why the club didn’t go ahead and sell Messi last summer when they wanted to. The fees they would have collected for him would not have erased that $ 1.5 billion (that’s more than the endowments from Baylor or Texas Tech), but it would have made a big dent. Today Barca are eating Atlético Madrid dust in the Spanish league after selling Luis Suárez to Atléti and seeing the Uruguayan striker regain his form. When Messi travels to Manchester City in June, the abyss will beckon Barcelona. The good news? Sergiño Dest seems to be paying off.

Speaking of him, which Americans have moved this year?
A lot ! DeAndre Yedlin has traveled from Newcastle to Galatasaray, so instead of spending the winter months watching the rain in the north of England, he will be at the heart of a fierce Turkish League title fight between the Lions. and their rivals, the Yellow Canaries of Fenerbahçe. (For some reason, the Turkish teams were the only ones spending the money this winter.) Meanwhile, speaking of loans, Chris Richards couldn’t break into the starting XI at Bayern Munich, so the German titans loaned it to TSG Hoffenheim. FC Dallas sold Richards to Bayern two years ago, but what everyone is talking about is that this quarter the Hoops sold Fort Worth’s Bryan Reynolds to AS Roma. The giallorossi have a great history, American ownership and an outside chance to reshuffle the two Milanese teams ahead of them in the title race. Two years ago Reynolds was touring for North Texas SC, and now he will play alongside Edin Džeko, Pedro and Chris Smalling.

Doesn’t FC Dallas want to keep its best players?
I’m sure the home side would like to be a financial and footballing giant like Manchester City or Real Madrid. At the moment, however, providing players for the best European teams is much better than being completely off their radar. Previously, the U.S. National Team would have a Dallas player in their lineup at best. Now FC Dallas is on the resumes of Richards, Reynolds and Weston McKennie, who, despite testing positive for COVID-19 in October, turned a bright spot in a hectic season for Juventus, and has been called theft from the last transfer window to Serie A. (This will take some of the sting away from the thieves who literally robbed his home in Turin recently.) The future of the USA team could have these guys who wore the red stripes and white team members.

What else happened in the Italian league?
The best-known name on Italian TV news was Romano Mussolini, the great-grandson of former dictator Benito Mussolini. He was playing defense for an under-18 team in the farming system, and now he’s been called up to Lazio’s senior squad, quite appropriately.

Why is this appropriate?
Lazio has a long history of rapprochement with the fascists in their fans and in politics. When I say “fascist” I don’t mean rude right-wingers, I mean real people who wear boots and armbands, carry Benito’s picture in their wallet, make Nazi salutes and make monkey noises. to opposing black players even if they have black players on their own team. Lazio matches are often accompanied by violence, especially when playing against Roma (their rivals across town whose fan base is the working class) or AS Livorno (whose fans are die-hard communists). Diplomatically, Romano said he was only there to work his game and not to discuss politics. Seeing that her mother is an active member of the Italian parliament who is dedicated to preserving her grandfather’s legacy (and feuding with Jim Carrey), we’ll see how well it turns out.

Nothing else?
The Dutch Cup tournament was considerably lively when second division team Den Bosch lost three goals against Excelsior Rotterdam, only to come back with four goals scored by striker Jizz Hornkamp, ​​whose name has, uh, caught the world’s attention. Jizz dribbles towards the goal! Jizz shoots! Jizz hits the target! The cum is hot tonight! The possibilities are limitless.

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Sequans announces $ 50 million financing to strengthen its balance sheet https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/sequans-announces-50-million-financing-to-strengthen-its-balance-sheet/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/sequans-announces-50-million-financing-to-strengthen-its-balance-sheet/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:41 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/sequans-announces-50-million-financing-to-strengthen-its-balance-sheet/ Use of the proceeds to include the repayment of convertible debt maturing on April 14, 2021, if not converted; repayment of risky debt in euros and general corporate objectives Sequans Communications SA (NYSE: SQNS), a leading developer and provider of 5G and 4G solutions for critical and massive broadband IoT, today announced the signing of […]]]>

Use of the proceeds to include the repayment of convertible debt maturing on April 14, 2021, if not converted; repayment of risky debt in euros and general corporate objectives

Sequans Communications SA (NYSE: SQNS), a leading developer and provider of 5G and 4G solutions for critical and massive broadband IoT, today announced the signing of a $ 50 million private financing with Lynrock Lake Master Fund LP, a fund managed by Lynrock Lake LP (“Lynrock Lake”), an investment management company with approximately $ 1.2 billion in assets under management. The financing consists of $ 10 million of US Depository Shares (ADS) and $ 40 million in principal of convertible debt. The funding is scheduled to close on April 9, 2021.

“A stronger balance sheet improves Sequans’ position as we accelerate our Massive IoT business and engage with potential strategic partners interested in our 5G technology. The increased liquidity on our balance sheet also provides the Company with additional working capital to manage the ongoing component and supply chain. dynamic, ”said Georges Karam, CEO of Sequans. “We are delighted to secure this financing with Lynrock Lake, an existing shareholder of Sequans. Lynrock Lake’s long-term, value-driven investment strategy and experience in the semiconductor industry aligns with our goals of maximizing opportunities in massive IoT and high speed 5G / 4G IoT and improve long-term shareholder value. ”

“Sequans is pursuing an aggressive 5G product roadmap for broadband and critical IoT, partially funded by strategic partners and investments from the French government,” said Cynthia Paul, chief investment officer of Lynrock Lake. “We are delighted to partner with Sequans to strengthen their capital structure and improve their strategic positioning as they engage with new and existing partners and suppliers.

The $ 50 million financing includes the sale of $ 10 million ADS at a price of $ 5.50 ADS and $ 40 million of convertible debt that converts to the Company’s ADS at a conversion price of 7.66 dollars. Convertible debt matures in three years and pays annual interest at an interest rate of 5.0625% for cash payments or 6% for payments in kind (PIK).

Sequans retains an option to repurchase convertible debt in certain circumstances after 12 months, in whole or in part, subject to a 9.9% holding limit for Lynrock Lake. Lynrock Lake did not apply for a seat on the board.

The main use of the proceeds will be the repayment of $ 11.7 million of convertible debt and accrued interest due on April 14, 2021, if not converted, and the prepayment of € 6 million (7 million of dollars) of debt in euros. The remaining proceeds will be used for general corporate purposes.

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements regarding the expected time of the closing of the Transaction and the use of the proceeds. All statements other than actual and historical facts and conditions contained in this release, including statements regarding business strategy and plans, IoT sales expectations and our goals for future operations, are statements. prospective (within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). These statements are only predictions and reflect our current beliefs and expectations regarding future events and are based on assumptions and subject to risks and uncertainties and subject to change at any time. We assume no obligation to update the information contained in this press release in the event that facts or circumstances subsequently change after the date of this press release. We operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks appear from time to time. In view of these risks and uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance or reliance on these forward-looking statements. Actual events or results may differ materially from those contained in projections or forward-looking statements. In addition to the risk factors contained in our Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2020, some of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this document include, but are not limited to y limit: (i) contraction or lack of growth in the markets in which we compete and in which our products are sold, (ii) unexpected increases in our expenses, including manufacturing expenses, (iii) our failure to adjust expenses quickly enough to make up for any unforeseen shortfall, (iv) delays or cancellations of expenses by our customers, (v) unexpected reductions in average selling prices, (vi) the significant fluctuation at which our Quarterly revenues and operating results are subject due to cyclicality in the wireless communications industry and transitions to new traffic technologies. ment, (vii) our inability to anticipate future market demands and the future needs of our customers, (viii) our inability to obtain new concepts or design wins to result in deliveries of our products at the levels and on time that we currently anticipate, (ix) our inability to enter into and execute strategic alliances, (x) our ability to meet performance milestones under strategic licensing agreements, (xi) the impact of natural disasters on our procurement operations and supply chain, (xii) our ability to address material weaknesses in our internal controls relating to controls over the accounting and reporting of complex, non-routine transactions and certain other transactions, including certain revenue agreements, (xiii) the impact of the coronavirus on the ability to operate our business and the research, production of our products or demand of our products by customers whose supply chain is affected or whose operations have been affected by government shelter-in-place or similar orders, (xiv) the impact of the coronavirus on capital markets and our ability to raise debt and equity financing, and (xv) other factors detailed in documents we do from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

About Sequans

Sequans Communications SA (NYSE: SQNS) is a leading developer and supplier of 5G and 4G chips and modules for massive, high-speed and mission-critical IoT. For massive 5G / 4G IoT applications, Sequans offers a comprehensive product portfolio based on its flagship Monarch LTE-M / NB-IoT and Calliope Cat 1 platforms, offering low power consumption, a wide range of built-in features. and a deployment capability. For high-speed 5G / 4G and critical IoT applications, Sequans offers a portfolio of products based on its Cassiopeia Cat 4 / Cat 6 4G and high-end Taurus 5G chip platforms, optimized for residential, enterprise and industrial at low cost. Founded in 2003, Sequans is headquartered in Paris, France, with additional offices in the US, UK, Finland, Israel, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and China . Visit Sequans online at www.sequans.com.

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One injured in car crash on Bay Street in Springfield – WWLP https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/one-injured-in-car-crash-on-bay-street-in-springfield-wwlp/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/one-injured-in-car-crash-on-bay-street-in-springfield-wwlp/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:40 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/one-injured-in-car-crash-on-bay-street-in-springfield-wwlp/ Springfield Police investigate shot dead man on Dawes Street Video / 1 day ago Video Great Barrington school staff accused of raping student Video / 1 day ago Video South Hadley High School is allowed to reopen; start of classes Tuesday Video / 2 days ago Video Massachusetts House agrees to vaccinate representatives and staff […]]]>

Springfield Police investigate shot dead man on Dawes Street

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Great Barrington school staff accused of raping student

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South Hadley High School is allowed to reopen; start of classes Tuesday

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Massachusetts House agrees to vaccinate representatives and staff

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Seriously injured in violent rollover accident in West Springfield, 3 more taken to hospital

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Pittsfield man shot dead in armed robbery of home

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Monson Police: Driver Charged After Leaving Autistic Child In School Van For Hours

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TD Garden will require proof of COVID-19 vaccination or negative test

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WFLA Now: Gabby Petito case now homicide investigation, FBI says

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Four men charged in April 2020 homicide in Springfield

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Sudders added to Holyoke Soldiers’ Home trial

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Greenfield Police are looking for a suspect; residents asked to avoid the Griswold Conservation Area

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